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The Strongest Predictor of Sexual Harassment? Your Culture!

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The Strongest Predictor of Sexual Harassment? Your Culture!

A landmark study revealed that the strongest predictor of sexual harassment has little to do with individual perpetrators. Rather, the most potent indicator is what researchers call “organizational climate”—in other words, your company’s culture.

While there is no silver bullet to reducing sexual harassment, we’ve found that one of the best ways to keep harassers at bay is to not just throw out the bad apples but focus instead on improving the whole barrel. As businesses are being held increasingly accountable for taking ownership of sexual harassment, we’re seeing that culture remains key to an enjoyable and competitive workplace.

Human resources professionals and culture advocates have said that, to improve the organizational climate, leaders must set the example, women must be promoted, and organizations must take swift action against inappropriate behavior. But where does one start with these undertakings? Three steps you can take to improve your culture and help decrease the likelihood of sexual harassment…

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Trump and the Role of Social Media

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Trump and the Role of Social Media

The Los Angeles Times recently published an article revealing several paid staffers on the Donald Trump campaign to have deeply inappropriate, racist content on their social media profiles, including posts that said “Muslims are unfit to be U.S. citizens, ridiculed Mexican accents, called for Secretary of State John F. Kerry to be hanged and stated their readiness for a possible civil war.”

This has ramifications on a political level, coming at a time where Donald Trump is seeking to broaden his appeal among minority voters and soften his status on illegal immigration in the lead-up to the election in November. Major offenders included Craig Bachler, one of Trump’s most senior staffers in Florida, and Mark Lloyd, Trump’s Virginia field director.

This controversy also raises the importance of vetting employees’ social media, and shows just how much one’s public profile says about their views, opinions, and image. It’s fair to say that any reasonable employer would never hire someone if they had known this information prior to these revelations; despite its notoriously inflammatory rhetoric, we should have this bare-minimum expectation for Mr. Trump’s campaign as well.

For the record, the Associated Press, which conducted the research of a number of Trump staffers’ profiles, also reviewed more than 3 dozen employees of Hillary Clinton and found nothing incriminating or inflammatory.

We used our software to run reports on Mr. Bachler and Mr. Lloyd, and between them we found dozens of “bad news” and red flags (nearly 40 pages all together) all culled from public information online; be it bigoted Facebook posts (with sexist, racist language and pictures), offensive tweets, and more. Any employer looking to run a cursory review of their potential employees would see this information and be unlikely to hire these men. Given the volatile nature of political campaigns, where an electorate and news cycle hangs on every word of candidates and controversy is brought to boil every moment, one would think there would be an even bigger premium on proper, basic vetting of staffers.

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Our First Post!

Our First Post!

Hello, world.

Thanks for visiting our blog. We are thrilled to welcome you to our community, and to offer this blog as a one-stop resource for any question you may have about online screening. Social media background checks are prevalent—in fact, 70% of employers are using publicly available social media to screen job candidates—but our automated approach represents a transformational shift in data accuracy, insight, and a demand for enhanced user privacy and compliance.

So please consider this blog as a resource to fill in the gaps of understanding, and to ask the tough questions around how to use publicly available online data to make hiring decisions.

New technologies tend to create as many questions as they do answers. As an example, we're frequently asked about the legality of social media screening, examples of how our insights are used, and which types of content tend to affect job performance. We hope to answer these questions here (and many more), and hope you'll stay tuned by signing up for our mailing list.

Until then, welcome!

-Ben